Three weeks, already!

Whoa, three weeks have gone by already, and we only have one more week left here!!! Time has flew by so fast, and we are about to start scrambling and analyzing our data as our results are due in a couple days. Looking forward to pulling everything together and seeing what everyone has come up with! Some of us are extremely talented at mapping and GIS, some are brilliant in statistics, some of us are good at writing, some specialize more in graphs, it’ll be a very interesting process for all of us to get together and write one report, but I’m glad we have a good mix of people all with their own special talents!

Today our group, consisting of me (Anita), Sarah, Cindy, and Justin stayed in and continued analyzing our sediment samples. Harder than it looks guys, takes a lot of time and patience! Cindy here is an expert now at watching water drip

CIndy sieving sediment.

CIndy sieving sediment.

Paige, Andrew, Ashley, and Marisa’s group went out and picked up their clod cards today. These are used to measure wave energy, and major props to them for having to swim with bricks in order put them out! All these cards had to be rubberbanded to bricks in order to stay underwater of course on the reefs

Clod cards.

Clod cards.

Nicole, Jessica, Sam, Kelsey, and Kate ’s group finished data collection finally on Reefs 1, 2, 20. Here is Nicole inspecting a coral calf and recording species diversity found on it.

Nicole recording data.

Nicole recording data.

After field work, we continued with Yuko on some more GIS training, and then we had a pretty awesome guest lecture with Shayle and Ariana who are currently working on some big projects here on Moku O’Loe! It was fun listening to Shayle talk about corals, he is so enthusiastic about them which is awesome. He showed us this secret room where they are going to hold coral larvae in the future, looks like a crazy torture chamber of some sort I know, but it’s for a good cause, I promise! Larvae is going to be held in those clear cones, and all the tubes you see is just to deliver a constant flow of water.

Future larvae nursery.

Future larvae nursery.

Paige holding coral tissue.

Paige holding coral tissue.

These tanks are holding Montipora capitata coral, they are currently studying coral resilience to ocean acidification, carbon dioxide levels, temperature, etc. They all have pH probes that give live data so Shayle can actually check on his coral babies with his phone!

Montipora capitata tanks.

Montipora capitata tanks.

Kate was really devastated looking at the piece of bleached coral on Paige’s shoulder

Bleached coral.

Bleached coral.

Group listening intently about corals.

Group listening intently about corals.

Ariana showed us some really cool larvae underneath a microscope settling on these plugs, did you know that larvae can form microcolonies after settling and fuse? Here is a picture of a microcolony forming on the left

Larvae microcolonies

Larvae microcolonies

Ariana talking about coral settlement.

Ariana talking about coral settlement.

It’s been a long day of field work, analyzing data, lectures, and now we are all working on revising our Introductions and Materials and Methods. Have you ever tried writing a paper with 12 other people? Wish you could see us working right now, with that being said, I gotta go and help with the paper now, friends and family that are going to come to our BBQ this Sunday, can’t wait to see you all!!! We are super excited to hang out with everyone!!!

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