Day 9: Hoe Hoe Hoe!

Our first day taking the reigns!

You heard it first, reporting from Miranda:

 

The day started with a BEAUTIFUL sunrise, submitting our proposals and preparation for going out on our assigned boats to begin our research projects.

Team Red Seas and Team Green paired up on the MOP boat with Captain Alexa to direct her to our reefs of need for the day– Reef patch number 4 and Reef patch number 9 — to officially begin our research data collection.  Team Red Seas, being the only team of 3, had a rough start finding our rhythm of collecting various parts of calving on the reef, areas at the reef edge where large chunks are mysteriously breaking off.  After a few attempts of trial and error, we finally figured out ways to maximize our time with each member smoothly carrying out the appointed tasks.  Dr. Hunter let us borrow her very own Chiyoko-Sized Hoe so we could attach an underwater camera and take data via video clips–the triumph of which is TBA..

Otherwise, Team Red Seas data collection was a success!! We then got to return to the boat, make our way to Reef 9 and rest top-side while Team Green carried out their scientific duties.  Team Red Seas later decided to make a trip off island (yayyy!!!) for vegan treats, coconut oil and real ice cream to hold us over until the next Costco trip. Here’s some photos for all you visual learners.

Look at that Beauty coming up!

Look at that Beauty coming up!

Team Red Seas' Life Records in Field Problems in Marine Biology

Team Red Seas’ Life Records in Field Problems in Marine Biology

A typical morning in the dorms scurrying to eat breakfast, make lunch, finish pending assignments and prep for a day on the water before a 9am briefing. (Man, I got exhausted just typing this out...)

A typical morning in the dorms scurrying to eat breakfast, make lunch, finish pending assignments and prep for a day on the water before a 9am briefing. (Man, I got exhausted just typing this out…)

Our Token Male!

Our Token Male!

Morning Classroom Thingzzz.

Morning Classroom Thingzzz.

Hayyyy Youuuu GUYYYYZZZZ!!

Hayyyy Youuuu GUYYYYZZZZ!!

Departure of Moku O Lo'e to collect date

Departure from Moku O Lo’e to collect data

Reef Patch 9

Reef Patch 9

A Lil Chiyoko R & R

A Lil Chiyoko R & R

An attempt to Dry the Pareo

An attempt to Dry the Pareo

Jordyn and the Beautiful Back Drop

Jordyn and a Beautiful Back Drop

Jazmin (Green Team) and her Mask Addition

Jazmin (Green Team) and her Mask Addition

Team Red Seas and our Daily Selfie

Team Red Seas and our Daily Selfie

The Gorgeous Reef Number 4!

The Gorgeous Reef Number 4!

Back at the Boat Dock

Back at the Boat Dock (Jazmin and Alina)

I see you!

I see you, Kalene!

The Chiyoko-sized Hoe!

The Chiyoko-sized Hoe!

Oh Sun! You so Ray-Z!

Oh Sun! You so Ray-Z!

Hello From the Other Side!

Hello From the Other Side!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi, this is Alex from Team Yellow. Today we went out to collect more data on the patch reefs of Kane’ohe Bay. My group created several transects to assess the coverage of coral and algae in the reefs of the northern bay. Needless to say, we did an amazing job. Field problems are slowly but surely turning into field solutions as we learn and improve each day. Not only are our skills as scientists growing but also our bonds of friendship between classmates. I never had sisters growing up but I feel I have just gained 14 of them.

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3 Responses to “Day 9: Hoe Hoe Hoe!”

  1. Rancs Says:

    Please allow a bit of writing critique, for learning purposes only, of course.

    First and foremost, great use of active voice reporting! It’s vibrant and captures the reader’s attention.

    The opening lacks parallel comparisons and use of proper syntax by placing the scenery descrition in the preparation activities. Had you opened with a single exclamation of the wonderous beauty of Mother Nature you may have been more apt to separate the activities of preparation. As it is reported, the scenery muddles the activities and scrambles the syntax of parallelism by beginning the opening list with a prepositional phrase (…with…), a gerund phrase (…submitting…) and a noun phrase (…preparation…). I only mention it here because you used a better example of parallelism in the closing paragraph when you listed: return, make and rest (although you used “…to return…” to begin the list)–but at least you paralleled three verb phrases.

    It’s a good practice to avoid using double prepositions in writings: “out on” in the first paragraph, “up on” in the second. We tend to blog our conversational verbiage, so I completely understand why this usage proliferates. Regardless, it’s popularity does not make it grammatically correct.

    Thank you for defining the term “calving the reef” after mentioning this esoteric phrase.

    Can you see what’s missing in this phrase:

    “Team Red Seas data collection…”?

    The data collection belongs to the team and the team’s name ends in ‘s’; therefore, an apostrophe follows the ‘s’ in Seas.

    “Here’s some” is the wrong syntax also. Here are some…

    Excellent use of photos to support the report. Keep up the great work! Lopks like you’re having a blast!

    I trust you will take these comments constructively.

  2. Rancs Says:

    One more thing: the title is very creative. To lend more powerful support to the title and how grateful the team was to receive the camera as a gift, you may have referenced “Christmas in July” or something to that effect.

  3. Rancs Says:

    We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea, whether it is to sail or to watch – we are going back from whence we came.

    John F. Kennedy
    D-MA; POTUS 1961-1963
    Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn151955.html?src=t_ocean

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